William Shakespeare's Cymbeline in the complete original text.
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Cymbeline

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Cymbeline Play

Cymbeline is the King of Britain. Widowed, Cymbeline has three children two of whom, Guiderius and Arviragus were kidnapped some twenty years ago leaving just daughter Imogen as heir. The King remarries, gaining the worthless stepson Cloten (rhymes with?) from his new but evil Queen. Cymbeline wants Imogen to marry Cloten but she disobeys, marrying her true love Posthumus Leonatus instead. This earns Posthumus banishment and Imogen imprisonment within the King's castle before they can consumate their marriage. Now in Rome, Posthumus accepts a 10,000 ducat bet that Frenchman Iachimo can seduce his wife Imogen, ruining her chastity. Iachimo fails, but wanting the money, steals a bracelet given by Posthumus as a parting token of their love, convincing Posthumus his wife has cheated. Enraged, Posthumus orders Imogen killed, the servant Pissanio realising Iachimo's treachery, refusing, but convincing Posthumus she is dead by hiding her as the male Fidele.

Despite being rejected by Posthumus, Imogen still rejects Clotus' hand in marriage. Now in a place called Milford Haven, Imogen disguised as a man meets her long lost brothers living with a Lord banished years ago by the King called Belarius.Imogen does not know her brothers were kidnapped by Belarius as revenge for being banished. Meanwhil,e Cloten has followed Imogen in disguise as Posthumus still wanting marriage. On his way to defile Imogen and kill Posthumus, Cloten meet Guiderius, Cloten being rude and being decapitated. The head is thrown in the river to hide the crime. Imogen now quite sick, takes a potion to cure her sickness that the Queen gave to servant Pisanio hoping it would reach Imogen or Posthumus. The Queen believes it is a poison she requested from Doctor Cornelius to ensure Cloten became king by either forcing Imogen to marry Cloten if Posthumus died or by killing Imogen making Cloten heir. Realising the Queen's evil, Doctor Cornelius provides a medicine that does not kill but places Imogen in a deep slumber. Thinking her dead, Imogen is laid to rest above ground next to the dead Cloten. Imogen awakes but thinks the dead body wearing Posthumus' clothes is not Cloten but Posthumus.

Meanwhile, Caaius Lucius demands the King pay tribute to August Caesar and Rome. The King refuses resulting in Rome declaring war. The Queen stressed from war and her missing son (Clotus ) dies, admitting hating the King in her last hours. Imogen in total grief and despair joins Caius Lucius' army, the King being captured only to be rescued by sons Guiderius and Arviragus, Posthumus and the banished Belarius. Posthumus is captured by the British who mistake him for a Roman. Posthumus has a vision, seeing his dead father, mother, brothers Guiderius and Arviragus and Jupiter. Imogen finally returns to the King, Iachimo admiting stealing Imogen's bracelet and good reputation, Clotens' death is told and Cornelius reveals the truth about the Queens' potion. Belarius aknowledges kidnapping Guiderius and Arviragus, a soothsayer (fortune teller) reveals a book placed in Posthumus' lap is from Jupiter, the god, Cymbeline shows mercy toward Belarius and Iachimo and the King finally allows Posthumus and Imogen to remain together...

Contents

Dramatis Personæ

Act I
Scene I, Scene II, Scene III, Scene IV, Scene V, Scene VI

Act II
Scene I,
Scene II, Scene III, Scene IV, Scene V

Act III
Scene I, Scene II, Scene III, Scene IV, Scene V, Scene VI, Scene VII

Act IV
Scene I, Scene II, Scene III, Scene IV

Act V
Scene I, Scene II, Scene III, Scene IV, Scene V

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